All posts by Shaya Lyon

Community update: March 2017

Late-night design sessions bring out the best in us! (Photo: LMP)

In this edition: An astronaut, a new website, local media & grant deadlines, and more!

LMP news

We’re turning 3 (and an astronaut is coming to the party)
In a truly spectacular display of inter-disciplinary thematic linking, we invite you to our 3rd birthday party: “The Astronaut, the Electric Theorbo, and the Plan that Wasn’t.” What happens when things don’t go according to plan in space? We’ll find out from former NASA astronaut Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper! What happens when you decide to merge an oversized lute with an electric guitar… and beer? That, too, will become clear (we think) when Aaron Grad hits the stage. Join us on April 11 at Naked City Brewery as we raise our cupcakes in a toast to improvisation! Tickets are $15 online, or $20 at the door. Get your ticket here.

We’re building a new website!
Speaking of turning 3… in our wise old age, we’ve learned a few things about maintaining concert listings. We’ve also invited concertgoers into our (makeshift) studio to observe them accomplishing tasks on the LMP. (One example: “Friends are coming to town next weekend. Find a concert to take them to. They’re flexible, but prefer Saturday if possible.” Or, “As you’re looking at this event, you realize the date is incorrect. What do you do?“)

Working with programming lead Nick Pozoulakis and designer Veronica De La Peña, we’re building on the best of the LMP and incorporating our learnings into a new website that will launch in the coming year. We’ll be focusing on comprehensiveness and accuracy; the event submission process; search; site speed; and more. We’ll keep you posted along the way!

We welcomed a volunteer coordinator!
The LMP is a small organization that relies on volunteers and interns to have a BIG impact. As we grow, we are thrilled and inspired by the dozens of volunteers who have given their time and skills to help us provide free services to our community. Enter Jon Icasas, LMP’s new volunteer coordinator and a long-time volunteer and supporter. Among other things, Jon is an engineer and a hobbyist musician who plays viola with the Seattle Philharmonic Orchestra. If you’ve signed up to volunteer, you’ll be hearing from him very soon. Welcome, Jon!

We felt your love!  
A big squishy bear hug to our donors this month: Heather Bentley, Jessica Fredican, Andrew Goldstein, James Holt, Mike Holzinger, Jonathan Lyon, Jane Turbiner, and Hannah Turbiner Lyon, Bill Manos, Sheila Oh, Jamee Pineda, and John Reale. And to our volunteers and interns: Andrea, Emily, Jon, Kent, Lily, and Nick. You make this all possible! (Hey, do you love the LMP? Join us as a volunteer or consider supporting our work with a $5 monthly donation!)

Community announcements

  • Tacoma Opera is holding auditions for principal roles (April 28-30).
  • Seattle Chamber Music Society is hiring a Director of Development with a focus on Individual Giving – a one-person department responsible for designing strategic fundraising initiatives and plans as well as for implementing donation processes and maintaining donor records.
  • Cornish College of the Arts seeks a director of marketing and and administrative assistant for the dance department.
  • KING FM is hiring a part-time music assistant.
  • Town Hall is hiring a full-time social media coordinator.
  • KEXP is hiring a lead audio engineer and donor services manager.
  • Resonance at SOMA Towers, an Eastside venue perfect for intimate music performance paired with wine and beer, is seeking nonprofit performing arts organizations and/or independent unincorporated musicians and ensembles interested in partnering during our 2017-18 season.
  • As Town Hall prepares for the upcoming renovation of its historic space, they invite you to a behind-the-scenes tour of the building as it stands today, and how it has been envisioned for the future (March 14 & 22).

Notable deadlines

  • March 6 – Seattle Office of Arts & Culture Youth Arts grant application deadline
  • March 27 – ArtsWA Project Support application deadline (level A – under $200K annual budget)
  • April 24 – ArtsWA Project Support application deadline (level B – $200K to $1M annual budget)
  • May 22 – ArtsWA Project Support application deadline (level C – over $1M annual budget)
  • Rolling – 4Culture Open Arts Grant; apply at least 6 weeks prior to event date
  • Rolling – Seattle Office of Arts & Culture smART ventures grant application deadline
  • Rolling – Langston Hughes Performing Arts Institute facility grant; apply at least two months prior to event date
  • Rolling – Spontaneous Free Tickets; contribute tickets up to 1 week prior to performance date

Media calendar deadlines

  • Seattle Magazine – submit events 3 months ahead for the print calendar
  • City Arts – submit 6 weeks ahead for the online/print calendar (and/or send releases to editorial@cityartsmagazine.com)
  • Seattle Times – submit 14 days ahead for consideration in the curated classical listings (online & print)
  • The Stranger submit any time to the online “Things to Do” calendar; for the quarterly Seattle Art & Performance, submit at least 5 weeks before the start of the quarter in which the event will take place
  • Seattle Met – submit 2-4 weeks ahead of event for the online calendar
  • Live Music Project – submit 1 week prior to performance date (online); deadline for weekend email listings is Wednesdays @ 5pm

To receive this LMP monthly community update by email, subscribe to our newsletter.

Submit announcements for inclusion in this newsletter by the 25th of each month.

Listening in the Round: An Interview with Stuart Dempster

Seattle Modern Orchestra / Solaris Vocal Ensemble: Double Portrait
March 11, 2017
Chapel Performance Space
Interview with Stuart Dempster 7:30pm
Concert 8:00 pm

Stuart Dempster’s living room emits a sound: a softly insistent rhythmic noise that my ears, then eyes track to an electrical timer plugged into a corner outlet. Long on this planet, plastic yellowed, its bits charge around in circles, increment by increment, with steadfast metronomic regularity.

I bring my thoughts back to S.M.O.R.E.S., the topic of our discussion. Dempster, 80, is a composer and trombonist; he’s premiering a new work by that name with the Seattle Modern Orchestra on March 11. The program also includes works by his colleague, Robert Erickson, who would have turned 100 this year. Erickson was part of a group of composers he commissioned in his early career that also included Luciano Berio, Andrew Imbrie, Ernst Krenek, Pauline Oliveros, Robert Suderburg, and several others.

Stuart Dempster, February 2017.
Stuart Dempster, February 2017. (Photo by Shaya Lyon)

(Lest you think this commission or his performance of it is an unusual occurrence, I should mention that Dempster’s many recent performances include a collaboration with Wayne Horvitz at the Asian Art Museum; an 80th birthday concert with William O. Smith, who was turning 90; several events with and in memory of his longtime collaborator and dear friend Pauline Oliveros; Bull Roarchestra at the Henry Art Gallery with Ann Hamilton; and a UW Dance Department commission with UW alum and Broadway/Merce Cunningham veteran Holley Farmer. Just last month, he led SMO in a performance of his work Choral Riffs with the Solaris Vocal Ensemble, who will join SMO to perform S.M.O.R.E.S.)

Dempster’s voice is low and gentle. As I record our conversation, I worry that the ticking timer will overpower it, but they work well together.

S.M.O.R.E.S., or “Seattle Modern Orchestra Resonating Enthusiastic Solaris,” was commissioned by SMO and Solaris Vocal Ensemble. The orchestration calls for mixed ensemble, voices, and audience – yes, audience – and seating is in the round, with the audience and Dempster at the center and the performers surrounding them.

Like other pieces Dempster has written recently, S.M.O.R.E.S. pairs structure with improvisation. Both the audience and the performers will have a score and a part to play. Dempster himself will play the trombone as a conductor-leader, and the performers will follow his lead.

“I move around in a circle, giving information to different people,” says Dempster. “I give them information by what I play, and then I give instructions for them to stop, or to do something else. There is the danger that I ‘abandon’ players if I get involved with one section… If I play something else, or if I abandon a player, they have the option to change what they’re doing – for example, choosing a different register, or a different pitch.”

S.M.O.R.E.S. can be played for any length of time; this performance will run for about 12-15 minutes. Beyond that, Dempster says, “I do it in real time – so I can’t really tell you what’s going to happen.”

SMO and Solaris will prepare for the unpredictable in rehearsal, and each time they go through the piece, it will yield a different result. As for the audience, you’ll be humming! (Dempster’s advice: Don’t be timid.)

Joining S.M.O.R.E.S. on the program is a similarly structured piece, Milanda Embracing, written in 1993-94 and named for the child who greeted Dempster and his fellow artists with open arms at a studio at the start of a residency.

Milanda Embracing also involves audience participation. It is more complex than S.M.O.R.E.S., and – unusually – the audience will have a score of its own. (No music-reading skills are required.)

It also differs from S.M.O.R.E.S. in that it’s not led by Dempster. Performers read the instructions, which include directives like “Send sounds across space.”

From the score of 'Milanda Embracing.'
From the score of ‘Milanda Embracing.’

“There’s no piece there, actually,” he says. “If you look at the score, there’s no piece. It’s what you should think in playing a piece, and through that, you can make a piece. It’s what I call the original minimalist piece – because there’s nothing there, among all this verbiage. But most of it is stuff people should be thinking about when they’re playing Haydn, or playing whatever.”

Dempster reassures that he’ll preface the performance with an explanation of the score and the piece itself, but that the players need the audience to join in.

“I have found that the kind of sounds that I make will be influenced by the kind of sounds that the audience makes, or thoughts that an audience has,” he wrote in 1994. “There is a beautiful feedback loop here.”

Also on the program are Erickson’s The Idea of Order at Key West, Pacific Sirens, and General Speech for solo trombone, commissioned by Dempster and written in the late 1960s by his colleague, Robert Erickson.

General Speech is performed with costume (an abstraction of a military costume) and lighting (for pomp and circumstance), and is designed to mimic the sounds of a military speech – specifically, General MacArthur’s “Duty, Honor, Country” farewell speech of 1962.

“MacArthur always seemed to be about nine feet tall,” says Dempster. “He had a huge presence in WWII, and certainly in Japan after the war. Erickson heard a recording of him speaking, and he was intrigued. We got together and decided to try this speech. I figured out a way to sort of say ‘Duty, Honor, Country’ on the trombone, and that’s how it got started.”

It was a 300-hour-long, side-by-side process. Dempster would start playing sounds, and Erickson would work on the score.

“First he’d say, ‘Play the words of the speech.’ After trying this, and then that, I would finally get it figured out. That would take 20 minutes, that one little phrase. Then he would ask – ‘What are you doing?’ – ‘I dunno…’ and we’d have to go back all over it again, trying to figure it out.”

After hours of working through it, they had a score that made some sense. (For a sneak preview, check out the video below.)

The sound of a speaking trombone is not only eerie, but unique to that instrument.

“Erickson – and others too – used to say trombone pieces were mostly piano pieces masquerading as trombone pieces, but when you start using the larger sound palate of the trombone, that’s a different thing,” says Dempster. “It’s idiomatic to the trombone to have all those vowels available. You don’t have that on harp, you don’t have it on piano, you don’t have it on much of anything.”

Dempster is a careful listener; he tunes in to everything from a passing garbage truck to the resonance of a specific corner of the Chapel space in the Good Shepherd Center, where this concert will take place.

“The building has a lot of sounds to offer. I was doing a piece one time – it was the centenary of the building in 2007. It was a Saturday afternoon, and there was a leaf blower outside. When it came my turn to play, Steve [Peters] started to close up the window. I said, no, no, open it! Of course it stopped fairly quickly once I started playing. And oh, the heating! It’s not as noisy as some classic new York heaters that just pound and crash and bang. The Chapel radiator is a little too polite (he laughs) – just one clunk once in a while. I like that. I always enjoy it when that happens.”

Of S.M.O.R.E.S., Dempster reiterates: Just listen! Listen to the performers, the sounds of the room, the surround. Resist the temptation to turn around, or even to turn your head around. Get used to people being behind you. If you do turn, he says, “turn really slowly so that you can change how the piece sounds by what you do in the audience.”

As our conversation winds down, I ask Dempster about the ticking timer. He laughs.

“Oh, that thing! That’s from the Sixties. I keep thinking I’m going to replace it. I probably said that 20 years ago, too.”

His tone sobers.

“You’re sitting here, and suddenly the power goes out. The refrigerator’s off, the heater’s off, and that thing is off. You do have this magnificent quiet. But – it’s been sounding like that for a very long time. In an odd way, it doesn’t bother me… it’s in there with all the other stuff I listen to.”

Come hear Stuart Dempster perform with Seattle Modern Orchestra and Solaris Vocal Ensemble on March 11, 2017. Concert begins at 8pm; arrive at 7:30 for a moderated chat with the composer. Tickets/more info here.

[LIVESTREAM] NOCCO’s Resonance: Celebrating Black American Composers

North Corner Chamber Orchestra (NOCCO) is celebrating Black American composers with a new work by composer Hanna Benn with text and film by Davida Ingram and additional original music by Alex Guy. Also on the program are works by Pulitzer Prize winning composers George Walker (b. 1922) and Scott Joplin (1868-1917) and a gorgeous string work by Alvin Singleton (b. 1940).

Tonight, February 19, 2017 they performed the following program:

Hanna Benn – Sankofa (world premiere)
Joplin – Selections from Treemonisha (1912, arr. Rick Benjamin) 
Walker – Orpheus for Chamber Orchestra and narrator (1994)
Alvin Singleton – Eine Idee ist ein Stück Stoff

For more information about the project, visit NOCCO’s website.

NOCCO is a conductorless orchestra of chamber musicians that performs a full spectrum of art music in a variety of spaces accessible to diverse audiences. They envision a community where the sharing of live, immersive events between musicians and listeners illuminates the profound and joyful interconnectedness of humanity.

Community update: February 2017

30 new friends in 60 minutes: new music speed-dating. (Credit: Jim Holt)

In this edition: A new intern, so many jobs, local media & grant deadlines, and more!

LMP news

We went to a music festival!
In a typical LMP week, we’ll meet a few new folks – composers, performers, arts admins, idea people. So imagine the excitement of meeting 100 new friends in one day! Last Saturday, we did just that at NUMUS Northwest. The festival kicked off with speed-dating (let’s call it “speed-friending”): 30 up-close conversations in 60 minutes. We attended sessions on group improvisation and time management, and just when things were getting intense, two concerts (afternoon and evening) came to the rescue, giving us a moment to take a breath while taking in a rich variety of new composed music from Pacific Northwest artists. What an incredible day! (Photos here.)

We welcomed Lily!
We’re excited to introduce you to our spring intern, Lily Shababi! Lily is a Violin Performance major at Cornish College of the Arts, and is also a violinist for Orchestra Seattle. She is passionate about chamber music, traditional Persian music, and pursuing her dream of eventually becoming a dog owner. Sit back, put on a pair of headphones, and let her music carry you away

We felt your support!  
A big hug to our donors this month: Heather Bentley, Jessica Fredican, Mike Holzinger, Steve Layton, Jonathan Lyon, Jane Turbiner, and Hannah Turbiner Lyon, Bill Manos, Sheila Oh, Jamee Pineda, John Reale, and two lovely anonymous humans. And to our volunteers: Andrea, Emily, Jon, Kent, and Nick. You make everything possible! (Hey, do you love the LMP? Join us as a volunteer or consider supporting our work with a $5 monthly donation!)

Community announcements

  • As Town Hall prepares for the upcoming renovation of its historic space, they invite you to a behind-the-scenes tour of the building as it stands today, and how it has been envisioned for the future (February 16 & 22).
  • Musicians and music lovers may still take part in this survey about providing health education, advocacy, and access to healthcare to Seattle area musicians.
  • The Seattle Video Game Orchestra & Choir (VGOC) is currently recruiting all instruments for its upcoming concert season.
  • Northwest Boychoir seeks a full-time administrative assistant for its busy office in Seattle’s University District.
  • Bremerton Symphony seeks Principal Bassoon and Section Horn.
  • Cornish College of the Arts seeks a part-time master audio engineer.
  • KING FM is hiring a development coordinator.
  • Town Hall is hiring a house manager and event staff.
  • KEXP is hiring a lead audio engineer and junior software developer.
  • Emerald City Music seeks event volunteers and ushers for a concert in South Lake Union on 2/10 (8:00 p.m.), call time from 5:30 p.m. to end of concert.

Notable deadlines

  • February 16 – NEA Art Works Grants application deadline
  • February 22 – 4Culture Arts Facilities application deadline
  • March 1 – 4Culture Art Projects application deadline
  • March 6 – Seattle Office of Arts & Culture Youth Arts grant application deadline
  • March 27 – ArtsWA Project Support application deadline (level A – under $200K annual budget)
  • April 24 – ArtsWA Project Support application deadline (level B – $200K to $1M annual budget)
  • May 22 – ArtsWA Project Support application deadline (level C – over $1M annual budget)
  • Rolling – 4Culture Open Arts Grant; apply at least 6 weeks prior to event date
  • Rolling – Seattle Office of Arts & Culture smART ventures grant application deadline
  • Rolling – Langston Hughes Performing Arts Institute facility grant; apply at least two months prior to event date
  • Rolling – Spontaneous Free Tickets; contribute tickets up to 1 week prior to performance date

Media calendar deadlines

  • Seattle Magazine – submit events 3 months ahead for the print calendar
  • City Arts – submit 6 weeks ahead for the online/print calendar (and/or send releases to editorial@cityartsmagazine.com)
  • Seattle Times – submit 14 days ahead for consideration in the curated classical listings (online & print)
  • The Stranger submit any time to the online “Things to Do” calendar; for the quarterly Seattle Art & Performance, submit at least 5 weeks before the start of the quarter in which the event will take place
  • Seattle Met – submit 2-4 weeks ahead of event for the online calendar
  • Live Music Project – submit 1 week prior to performance date (online); deadline for weekend email listings is Wednesdays @ 5pm

To receive this LMP monthly community update by email, subscribe to our newsletter.

Submit announcements for inclusion in this newsletter by the 25th of each month.

Community update: January 2017

Our board mascot, the fireball-of-awesome-projecting unicorn.

In this edition: A new muse, a call for volunteers, local media & grant deadlines, and more!!

LMP news

The Northwest has a new muse!
Ready for this? We’ve been getting excited about January 28th because it’s the very first NUMUS Northwest – a day-long, artistically-stunning event dedicated to the creation, performance, and experience of new music in Seattle. With a fantastic program of 7 workshops, 10 performances (think Oliveros and Cage), and time to breathe in between, NUMUS is open to musicians and non-musicians alike. The event is coordinated by 6 local music enthusiasts, including our director, Shaya Lyon. Peruse the schedule or jump in head-first and get a $20 day pass. Students are free at the door with ID.

We’re looking for volunteers!
From software development to calendar maintenance, LMP relies on volunteers to provide thousands of Seattleites with information about upcoming concerts. Volunteers can hang with LMP staff at cafes or contribute from home whenever the mood strikes. Occasionally, there are bagels. Got an hour? We’ll fill it! Join us

We met our first fundraising goal (whoah!) 
A heartfelt thank you to our donors this month, who helped us cross our first $10,000 finish line and kick off the next: Winston Addis, Gilbert Bendix, Heather Bentley, Celia Bowker, George Bozarth, Paul Carlson, Koala Coach, GraceAnn Cummings, Cami Davis, Jessica Fredican, Mike Holzinger, Lenore Jackson, Emma Lynn, Jonathan Lyon, Jane Turbiner, and Hannah Turbiner Lyon, Bill Manos, Sheila Oh, Jamee Pineda, John Reale, Tim Schmuckal & Kate Ross, Alex Slover and Ursula Sahagian Slover, Paul Taub, and Raymond Wachter! And to our volunteers: Brendan, Mason, Jon, and Nick. You make everything possible! (Hey, do you love the LMP too? Join us as a donor!)

Community announcements

  • Seattle Musicians Access to Sustainable Healthcare (SMASH), a non-profit dedicated to keeping our music community healthy and thriving, is conducting a survey to learn how to meet healthcare needs.
  • As Town Hall prepares for the upcoming renovation of its historic space, they invite you for a behind-the-scenes tour of the building as it stands today, and how it has been envisioned for the future (January 12 & January 26).
  • New Works for Percussion Project announces their 2017 commission consortium for solo percussion by composer Dave Molk – register here.
  • Seattle Art Song Society will hold general auditions for singers and pianists on January 20.
  • Bach in the Subways Seattle is seeking pianists to premiere a work by Kristoffer Zegers featuring 25 pianos and 50 pianists – contact GraceAnn Cummings if you’d like to perform.
  • Seattle Chamber Music Society is seeking two part-time, seasonal marketing & community engagement coordinators for its 2017 Summer Festival to work toward the marketing, community engagement, and event production of the SCMS Broadcast in Park program, Music Under The Stars.
  • The Seattle Times has replaced their comprehensive classical listings with a shorter curated list that is published Fridays, both in print (in Weekend Plus) and online (seattletimes.com/entertainment).
  • KING FM is seeking a part-time board operator, a research intern for Second Inversion, event volunteers, and fund drive volunteers.
  • KEXP is hiring an Upstream program liaison and an IT operations engineer.

Application deadlines

  • January 12 – New Music USA Project Grant application deadline
  • January 25 – NEA Art Works grants for organizations registration deadline (submit by February 7)
  • February 22 – 4Culture Arts Facilities application deadline
  • March 1 – 4Culture Art Projects application deadline
  • Rolling – 4Culture Open Arts Grant; apply at least 6 weeks prior to event date
  • Rolling – Seattle Office of Arts & Culture smART ventures grant application deadline
  • Rolling – Langston Hughes Performing Arts Institute facility grant; apply at least two months prior to event date
  • Rolling – Spontaneous Free Tickets; contribute tickets up to 1 week prior to performance date; exceptions can be made, schedule-permitting

Media calendar deadlines

  • Seattle Magazine – submit events 3 months ahead for the print calendar
  • City Arts – submit 1 month ahead for the online/print calendar (and/or send releases to editorial@cityartsmagazine.com)
  • Seattle Times – submit 14 days ahead for consideration in the curated classical listings (online & print)
  • The Stranger submit any time to the online “Things to Do” calendar; for the quarterly Seattle Art & Performance, submit at least 5 weeks before the start of the quarter in which the event will take place
  • Seattle Met – submit 2-4 weeks ahead of event for the online calendar
  • Live Music Project – submit 1 week prior to performance date (online); deadline for weekend digest is Wednesdays @ 5pm

To receive this LMP monthly community update by email, subscribe to our newsletter.

Submit announcements for inclusion in this newsletter by the 25th of each month.

Community update: December 2016

Super-volunteer-coders Nick and Sheila hard at work.
Super-volunteer-coders Nick and Sheila hard at work.

In this edition: A road trip, a love note, an orchestra map, local media & grant deadlines, and more!

LMP news

We went on the road!
What if you could spend an entire day dropping in on artists to see them at work? You might come across a composer jamming on an electric theorbo, a conductor studying scores in a bustling cafe, a Henry hanging out with a herd of harpsichords, or a vocalist singing about the earth opening up while dreaming about puppies. We spent Tuesday on the road visiting as many Seattle composers, performers, presenters, radio broadcasters, and arts organizations as we could – and we livestreamed each visit on Facebook. Starting with an early-morning sipping chocolate and winding down with a morsel of Bach in a sunset-somber Benaroya Hall, our day was SO much fun that we’re already thinking about doing it again.

We built fundraising software!
One thing we love about our work is that we get to develop software that is mission-driven, and last month we rolled out a prototype of Donation Dots – the dottiest of interactive fundraising platforms – in service of our goal to amplify local arts resources. The first ensemble to use Donation Dots is the Seattle Collaborative Orchestra, an intergenerational ensemble comprised of student, community, and professional musicians. We think they’re great for providing a free educational and mentoring opportunity alongside a progressive performance experience, and we’re thrilled to be working on this with them. Check out the Donation Dots page for their Dec. 6 concert – we hope you delight in the dots!

86 trombones? No, wait, that's a full orchestra! LMP's Donation Dots fundraising platform in action.
86 trombones? No, wait, that’s a full orchestra! LMP’s Donation Dots fundraising platform in action.

We sent love notes!
Here’s one: “The performances were beautiful – a kind of beautiful that also manifested itself as the power to inspire a unified sense of love and healing upon all of us that attended…” ~ Signed, AJ in Seattle. Were you moved by a recent performance? Did it make you feel happy, sad, anything at all? Did it remind you of a special moment, or inspire you to try something new? Leave a note and we’ll pass it on to the artists.

Speaking of love notes…
A heartfelt thank you to our donors this month: Carol Banach, Brian Chin, Veronica De La Peña, Ann Farr, Jessica Fredican, Mike Holzinger, Jonathan Icasas, Kate Ladenheim, Desmid Bendix Lyon, Gloria Hollander Lyon, Bill Manos, Sheila Oh, John Reale, Michael Schell, Robert Weltzien, Evan Wilder, and one anonymous hero! And to our volunteers: Brendan, Mason, Nick, and Nikki. You make everything possible! (Hey, do you love building community around classical music? Join us as a volunteer or a donor!)

Community announcements

  • Wanted: Strings, percussion, and vocalists for large ensemble performance opportunity
  • The Medieval Women’s Choir is seeking an energetic early music enthusiast to join their board of directors – please contact Jean Millican for more information.
  • Seattle Art Song Society is holding general auditions for singers and pianists on January 20, 2017.
  • KING FM is seeking a part-time board operator, a research intern for Second Inversion, event volunteers, and fund drive volunteers.
  • KEXP is hiring a major giving officer.
  • The Langston Hughes Performing Arts Institute is seeking ushers.

Notable deadlines

  • December 5 – Seattle Magazine print calendar (March issue) submission deadline
  • December 15 – Upstream Music Festival submission deadline
  • January 4 – City Arts calendar (February issue) submission deadline
  • January 12 – New Music USA Project Grant application deadline
  • February 22 – 4Culture Arts Facilities application deadline
  • Rolling – 4Culture Open Arts Grant; apply at least 6 weeks prior to event date
  • Rolling – Langston Hughes Performing Arts Institute facility grant; apply at least two months prior to event date
  • Rolling – Seattle Times calendar (digital and print); submit 14 days in advance
  • Rolling – Seattle Met digital calendar; submit 2-4 weeks in advance
  • Rolling – LMP calendar submission deadline is 1 week prior to performance date; deadline for weekend digest is Wednesdays @ 5pm
  • Rolling – Spontaneous Free Tickets may be donated up to 1 day prior to performance date

To receive this LMP monthly community update by email, subscribe to our newsletter and select “LMP & community news.”

Submit announcements for inclusion in this newsletter by the 25th of each month.

LMP On the Road: Giving Tuesday

What if you could spend an entire day dropping in on artists to see them at work?

Aaron Grad and his homemade theorbo.
Aaron Grad and his homemade theorbo.

You might come across a composer jamming on an electric theorbo, a conductor studying scores in a bustling cafe, a Henry hanging out with a herd of harpsichords, or a vocalist singing about the earth opening up while dreaming about puppies.

We spent Giving Tuesday on the road visiting as many Seattle composers, performers, presenters, radio broadcasters, and arts organizations as we could – and we livestreamed each visit on Facebook. Starting with an early-morning sipping chocolate and winding down with a morsel of Bach in a sunset-somber Benaroya Hall, our day was SO much fun we’re already thinking about doing it again.

We invite you to scroll down through our day, and come along for the ride!

Station 1: Sipping chocolate with Andrew Goldstein of Emerald City Music.

Station 2: Aaron Grad shreds an electric theorbo *that he made*!

Station 3: Dropping in on the Seattle Philharmonic Orchestra with maestro Adam Stern.

Station 4: Visiting with Henry Lebedinsky of Early Music Underground. We’ve never seen so many harpsichords at once!

Station 5: Seattle composer Kaley Lane Eaton treats us to some of her own creations.

Station 6: Behind the scenes with Seneca and Jeremy at the Seattle Chamber Music Society.

Station 7: A quick visit to KING FM and Second Inversion with the lovely Christophe Chagnard, Maggie Stapleton, Dave Beck, and Mike Brooks.

Station 8: Getting cultured at 4Culture with Christina DePaolo and Charlie Rathbun. Keep an eye on their many grant opportunities. If you’re serving King County through the arts, there’s something here for you!

Station 9: Seattle Symphony cellist Joy Payton shares a few captivating notes as the sun sets behind Benaroya Hall.

Station 10: Finale – LMP board shenanigans!

We hope you enjoyed the trip as much as we did!