Category Archives: Blog

Learn to play the piano one note at a time

Neal Kosaly-Meyer: Gradus for Fux, Tesla and Milo the Wrestler
Saturday, August 19, 2017 at 8pm
Chapel Performance Space at the Good Shepherd Center, Wallingford, Seattle

I heard ducks during Neal Kosaly-Meyer’s practice session for his upcoming show, Gradus for Fux, Tesla and Milo the Wrestler. His practice space doubles as the Maple Leaf home of Keith (Neal’s college buddy) and Karen (Neal’s sister). The residential neighborhood provides ambient noises of traffic, rustling of note paper (mine), airplanes above, voices in the next room, and – I’m pretty sure – ducks.

Neal has created a framework to play improvised piano pieces with a lot of silence, sparse notes, quick groupings and permutations of notes, and random ambient noises.

The enjoyment comes from the anticipation derived from silence, and then a sudden soft note or a single note played loudly. What’s next? Be patient. There could be one note, BAM, or 5 quick notes, BAM BAM BAM BAM BAM. It might be a mix BAM PING BAM BAM PING. There could be sustain, BAAAAAMMMMM. Somewhere in there, ambient noises might appear; fowl quacking out the window.

This forces me to listen to these notes in a new way. Be patient; wait for it. I hear notes for themselves, pure and clean, unencumbered by chords or progressions.

(Neal Kosaly-Meyer. Photo by Joe Mabel)
(Neal Kosaly-Meyer. Photo by Joe Mabel)

Neal mildly bristles at this notion of “unencumbered.” There is sometimes conflict between what the artist wants to convey, and what a particular audience member receives: that’s part of the magic. People create their own interpretations. That’s a beautiful aspect of art.

“My experience with it…” he drops off, thoughtfully… “I have to find my own way into this every time I play this,” Neal explains. “There’s a trust that there’s enough sound, enough song going on inside a note, to sustain, to make something that’s got as much feeling and as much mystery as what a ‘normal composer’ would get by taking a bunch of notes and stringing them together.”

The song comes as the piece progresses, but early on, that isn’t clear. This is the emotional part of experiencing Neal’s work, and it’s wonderful.

Neal relates that he often thinks of a scene in the Woody Allen movie Take the Money and Run, where he plays the cello in a marching band. Eventually Woody just sits down and plays, and lets the band keep marching on. And that’s Neal: he’s just playing as others do other things.

Neal explains that the project first presented itself to him as a sentence that popped into his head when he was a graduate student at UW around 1985: “Learn to play the piano one note at a time.”

Based on that sentence, Neal laid out the project: the first session, he studied the lowest A; then two sessions for the second A up plus one with both of the lowest As; then four sessions for the third A plus the combinations with the lower two; then eight sessions for the fourth A plus combinations with the lower three. And so on. It took about 13 years and, if you’re counting at home, 255 sessions to move through all the combinations of the A pitches.


Silence and patience
A gift opportunity
Listen: Notes and noise


This was taking too long. Neal modified his approach, sticking with the idea of slowly incorporating one new note and one new pitch. Neal has now worked through A, E, C#, and G. He’ll be moving on to B after the upcoming performance is complete.

This has been an idea, slow developing, for Neal to grab onto.

There are four types of music, Neal explains. “There’s the music where you listen to silence; there’s the music where you have one note that you bring into that silence; the third kind is when you bring two notes into the silence; the fourth is when you bring three or more notes into the silence.” In Neal’s mind, once you have more than two notes, it’s the same mental game, whether you’re playing with three notes or eight.

“For me, these performances are acts of dedication to a principle that there is enough music in a few pitches, or a pair of pitches, in a single pitch, or even in silence – that there is enough music to be heard, enough to sustain us and delight us and transport us. This is an act of faith, and that faith is tested each time, but it is a faith which has been strengthened each time [I perform Gradus] as well.”

Neal arranges a public performance of two hours divided into three “rungs” of 20, 40, and 60 minutes. One of the movements will be dedicated to a single pitch, a second to two pitches, and a third to three or more pitches. Tossing coins – a devotion to John Cage – determines the arrangement of those rungs and the notes and pitches to be utilized in each rung.

From there, improv and random ambient noises steal the show – like the ducks I heard. Geese? The fan belt on the neighbor’s car? Our ears improvise sometimes; here’s a chance to listen and enjoy the unexpected.

Neal Kosaly-Meyer will perform ‘Gradus’ on Saturday, August 19, 2017 at 8pm at the Chapel Performance Space in Wallingford, Seattle. Details here.

GreatWall_GreatKent_BWxKent Karnofski has been a Seattleite most of his adult life. By day he is a research engineer at a local manufacturing firm, by night he is an extraordinary audiophile. In addition to his work with the Live Music Project, he is the curator and primary contributor at CommunityNoise.blog.

Community update: July 2017

Cellist Lavena Johanson and composer Judah Adashi. (Photo: Britt Olsen-Ecker)
Cellist Lavena Johanson and composer Judah Adashi. (Photo: Britt Olsen-Ecker)

In this edition: Bringing Baltimore to Seattle, a barbershop invitation, & gratitude – plus job openings, Seattle media & grant deadlines, and more.

LMP news

Coming in August: ‘Total Eclipse of My Heart… Comes Undone’
As the eclipsed sun sets, join us on August 21 at Naked City Brewery for an evening with composer Judah Adashi and cellist Lavena Johanson. Married last year in Seattle (Lavena’s hometown) and living in Baltimore (Judah’s hometown), these two musicians are passionate about creating inviting concert experiences, exploring the continuum between classical music and other genres, and engaging the world beyond music in their work. The mesmerizing centerpiece of their concert will be a piece that Judah wrote for Lavena in 2014, my heart comes undone. Doors open at 6:30, food and drink will be available for purchase throughout the evening. Proceeds benefit the Live Music Project. Tickets $15, or $25 with a surprise. See you there!

Thank yous and yous and yous!
A huge thank you to our volunteers, who have spent hours upon hours this month building our new website, maintaining the concert listings, and writing previews: Nick, Dan, Jon, Kent, Marjorie, Jennie, and Anton. And to our recent donors: Heather Bentley, Karin Brookes, Anna Edwards, Jessica Fredican, James Holt, Mike Holzinger, Jon Icasas, Jonathan Lyon, Jane Turbiner, and Hannah Turbiner Lyon, Bill Manos, Sheila Oh, John Reale, Maggie Stapleton, Mitsuo Tomita, and Josh Yotty, as well as Boeing and Microsoft corporate matching. We couldn’t do it without you!

Community announcements

  • MV Music is looking for community members to participate in a site-specific commission for the Olympic Sculpture Park. Email mvoytovich@gmail.com for more information.
  • The Seattle SeaChordsmen Barbershop Chorus will be holding a Guest Night rehearsal at the Queen Anne Baptist Church for those interested in learning about barbershop-style singing. (July 18)
  • Pacific Northwest Conducting Institute is still accepting applications. Day observers are welcome and should email orchestra@whidbey.com for further information.
  • KING FM is hiring an assistant program director, webmaster, and more.
  • The Seattle Symphony is hiring teaching artists to work in all areas of their Education and Community Engagement programs.
  • The Seattle Philharmonic is looking for arts-loving community members interested in joining their board of trustees.
  • Sammamish Symphony Orchestra is auditioning for trumpet players and section players in all string sections.

Notable deadlines

Media calendar deadlines

  • Seattle Magazine – submit events 3 months ahead for the print calendar
  • City Arts – submit 6 weeks ahead for the online/print calendar (and/or send releases to editorial@cityartsmagazine.com)
  • Seattle Times – submit 14 days ahead for consideration in the curated classical listings (online & print)
  • The Stranger submit any time to the online “Things to Do” calendar; for the quarterly Seattle Art & Performance, submit at least 5 weeks before the start of the quarter in which the event will take place
  • Seattle Met – submit 2-4 weeks ahead of event for the online calendar
  • Live Music Project – submit 1 week prior to performance date (online); deadline for weekend email listings is Wednesdays @ 5pm

To receive this LMP monthly community update by email, subscribe to our newsletter.

We invite you to submit announcements/deadlines for inclusion in this newsletter by the 25th of each month. You can do that here.

Past issues are located in the archive.

Alt-Jazz Poetry for a Casual Night Out

(The Daphnes. Photo by Stephen Schildbach)
(The Daphnes. Photo by Stephen Schildbach)

 

There’s a sense of wandering in Monica’s voice, as she describes The Daphnes’ style as a mix of music and poetry and singing.

“I studied poetry, that’s what my degree actually is in, and harp was my minor when I went to college… After I graduated, I was hanging out with all these jazz musicians; being a poet, I was really drawn to the Beats and the merging with jazz and improvisational playing and that seemed like something that I wanted do.”

Monica Schley, harpist, poet, and vocalist, writes and composes the material for The Daphnes. Julie Baldridge (violin) and Nate Omdal (bass) complete the trio for this unconventional group. For a Seattle-neighborhood dinner sort of evening, this is a talented trio with plenty to share over a glass of wine.

The Daphnes perform next on Friday, June 23, 2017 @ 7:00 pm at the Stone Way Cafe, Seattle. Details here.

Community update: June 2017

A pulsar, projected during a live performance of Grisey's 'Le Noir de l’Etoile' at New Music Gathering in Ohio. (Photo: LMP)
A pulsar, projected during a live performance of Grisey’s ‘Le Noir de l’Etoile’ at New Music Gathering in Ohio. (Photo: LMP)

In this edition: LMP goes to Ohio, seeking storytellers, community announcements, job openings, local media & grant deadlines, and more.

LMP news

We talked tech in the flatlands of Ohio
In May, we set off for Bowling Green State University to meet with composers and performers at the 3rd annual New Music Gathering. We enjoyed a dozen workshops, demonstrations, and concerts (including a performance in the dark mimicking the radio sound emitted from pulsars – photo above). We also got to participate in a panel with representatives from CASH Music and New Music USA to discuss the ins and outs of building software that supports artists. We had a great time, the audience asked thoughtful questions, and Tom Steenland, founder of the Starkland record label, called it “The most interesting panel I attended… 3 sharp panelists, with an exceptionally broad overview of today’s new music scene.” We’re already looking forward to NMG2018!

We’re looking for storytellers
Do you love storytelling? We’re on the lookout for a grantwriting intern who will work closely with our executive director, Shaya, and board chair, Kevin, to keep our grant application cycle flowing as we grow our local programs and prepare to serve other cities in the fall. Kevin led the development of the innovative digital grantmaking and advocacy platform for New Music USA, and this internship will provide the hands-on experience in institutional fundraising including that non-profit organizations love to see in potential hires. Prior grantwriting experience is nice to have but not required. More important: writing skills! Grantwriting is about telling a story. Interested? Learn more about the internship here, or pass this on to an eloquent friend.

You gave big! 
We had our first-ever Give Big campaign last month, and you made us feel all warm and fuzzy with your generosity. A huge thank you to our May donors and Give Big givers: Heather Bentley, Rachel Bittner, Galen Broderick, Karin Brookes, Jennifer Chung, Jessica Fredican, Rose Gear, James Holt, Erin Jorgensen, Mike Holzinger, Jon Icasas, Wesley Kim, Nyaradzo Kundidzora, Karissa Lew, Laura Loge, Jonathan Lyon, Jane Turbiner, and Hannah Turbiner Lyon, Bill Manos, Anouk Moulliet, Sheila Oh, Lesley Petty, John Reale, Katie Skovholt, Melanie Voytovich, Virginia Wright, and three anonymous supporters, as well as Boeing, Microsoft, Nerdwallet, and Nordstrom. And to our volunteers (Andrea, Dan, Emily, Jon, Kent, Lily, Marjorie, Nick, and Veronica) and departing interns (Hailey, Jeff, and Maddie): you rock our world!

(Hey, do you love getting our classical listings? Consider supporting our work with a $10 monthly donation, or by volunteering with the Calendar Squad.)

Kevin Clark, Shaya Lyon, and Ed Harsh at New Music Gathering in Ohio. (Photo: Tom Steenland)
Kevin Clark, Shaya Lyon, and Ed Harsh at New Music Gathering in Ohio. (Photo: Tom Steenland)

Community announcements

  • The Seattle Philharmonic is looking for arts-loving community members interested in joining their board of trustees!
  • St. James Cathedral, Seattle, has immediate openings for tenor and bass-baritone singers to join the Cathedral Cantorei, the professional ensemble that supports the volunteer Cathedral Choir.
  • Chamber Music Madness presents Tuned In! Student Chamber Music Festival, providing violin, viola, cello and piano students ages 13-24 professional chamber music coaching by the Skyros Quartet, Seattle’s only full-time professional string quartet (July 10-15, 2017).
  • Northwest Girlchoir is holding auditions throughout the spring.
  • The Seattle Symphonic Band is looking for additional musicians to join the group.
  • Sammamish Symphony Orchestra is auditioning for trumpet players and section players in all string sections.
  • KING FM is hiring a program director, membership coordinator, webmaster, and more.
  • KEXP is hiring a traffic assistant and help desk technician.
  • Last chance to tour Town Hall before they break ground on renovations. Final 1-hour behind-the-scenes tours are June 1522, & 30.

Notable deadlines

Media calendar deadlines

  • Seattle Magazine – submit events 3 months ahead for the print calendar
  • City Arts – submit 6 weeks ahead for the online/print calendar (and/or send releases to editorial@cityartsmagazine.com)
  • Seattle Times – submit 14 days ahead for consideration in the curated classical listings (online & print)
  • The Stranger submit any time to the online “Things to Do” calendar; for the quarterly Seattle Art & Performance, submit at least 5 weeks before the start of the quarter in which the event will take place
  • Seattle Met – submit 2-4 weeks ahead of event for the online calendar
  • Live Music Project – submit 1 week prior to performance date (online); deadline for weekend email listings is Wednesdays @ 5pm

To receive this LMP monthly community update by email, subscribe to our newsletter.

We invite you to submit announcements/deadlines for inclusion in this newsletter by the 25th of each month. You can do that here.

~ Newsletter archive ~

From the Remnants of Horror

Music of Remembrance: Ceija
Sunday, May 21, 2017 @ 5:00 pm
Nordstrom Recital Hall at Benaroya Hall, Seattle

Traveling through Zion National Park, I found myself strolling through a slot canyon. I was noticing the smoothly carved rock, cut and shaped by eons of rushing, flowing water. Climbing out of the slots, back up to the road, I noticed a very different rock formation: turbulent, violent waters had crushed against this wall. Continuously.

(Zion National Park. Photo by Kent Karnofski)
(Zion National Park. Photo by Kent Karnofski)

It occurred to me that water has this duplicity – smooth or turbulent, flowing or crushing, friend or foe. We, too, have this parallel with our fellow humans, our neighbors, our friends. Each of us wants to think that we can love and respect each other, live and flow together. But sometimes that doesn’t happen. The human turbulence becomes inhuman and horrific.

The water we can understand, watch, and marvel. The humans? Painful and not understandable. We fail to confront.

Seattle’s Music of Remembrance gives us a way to begin the confrontation, in a space where music, art, and community come together to address conflict and horror.

MOR has commissioned Mary Kouyoumdjian to compose an original piece. Mary has found meaning in meeting and studying people who have lived through genocides; it provides an understanding of her own family. Her grandparents, both maternal and paternal, lived through the Armenian genocide, eventually being displaced to Lebanon, where much of her family still lives.

Mary’s new piece, to open myself, to scream, celebrates the life of Austrian-Romani Ceija Stojka, born in 1933, who survived the Holocaust and internment at Auschwitz, Ravensbrück, and Bergen-Belsen. Ceija was a painter, artist, writer, and musician; she passed away in 2013.

I spoke with Mary about her work, about Ceija, and about being a first-generation Armenian-American.

Mary got to know Ceija through her artwork, books, and, later, documentaries that featured her.

“She was an incredibly joyous person, but then you see the burden of her experience weigh her down from time to time. Understandably. Getting to know people on that level where you start to understand how these events, which happened so long ago, still eat away at them every day… That’s how I connect to these people,” Mary tells me.

Still from an animation by Kevork Mourad.
Still from an animation by Kevork Mourad. (Photo courtesy of MOR)

Mary’s new work is a multimedia piece in 4 movements, each movement inspired by selected paintings of Ceija’s. Each movement features a pre-recorded audio track as a backdrop, on top of which a 5-person ensemble (clarinet, trumpet, violin, cello, and double bass) will play live. The audio playbacks are influenced by Mary’s observation that past events continue to impart sorrowful backdrops to survivors’ lives; they live in the present, but they are also always living in the past. In addition, a hand-painted, 25-minute, animated film by projection artist Kevork Mourad will be synced to the pre-recorded audio, adding a visual experience for the audience.

This is a heavy, emotional space to work in. I asked Mary: Does the work become a burden?

“It can be totally burdensome, and these are not easy topics to confront, but I think it’s good to confront them,” she says. “Given my own family’s history, I’m drawn to these topics, and every time I re-approach them, it gives me a bit more understanding about my own family history and what my family members have gone through… and why my community is where it is in our present day. Selfishly, I’m getting something from it, too.”

Emotionally and intellectually, the enormity of genocide triggers overwhelm. As we’re stymied on how to proceed, this phenomenon continues to occur throughout the world. Music of Remembrance, Ceija’s art, and Mary’s new work give us a way to begin to understand – and discuss – the horrors of genocide. Perhaps, by learning the stories of individual lives and sorrows, some humanity can be regained while opening the door to progress.

Music of Remembrance’s Ceija will take place on Sunday, May 21, 2017 @ 5:00 pm in the Nordstrom Recital Hall at Benaroya Hall, Seattle. With Laura DeLuca (clarinet), Alexander White (trumpet), Mikhail Shmidt (violin), Walter Gray (cello), and Jonathan Green (double bass). Full details are here.

GreatWall_GreatKent_BWxKent Karnofski has been a Seattleite most of his adult life. By day he is a research engineer at a local manufacturing firm, by night he is an extraordinary audiophile. In addition to his work with the Live Music Project, he is the curator and primary contributor at CommunityNoise.blog.

Community update: May 2017

Aaron Grad rocks out on his electric theorbo at the LMP’s 3rd birthday celebration last month.

In this edition: Board update, seeking developers, birthday bliss, local media & grant deadlines, and more!

LMP news

We turned 3 :)
What a phenomenal evening! An astronaut, an electric theorbist, and 60 wonderful guests walked into a bar, and it was magical. We raised cupcakes in a toast, raised funds for the coming year, celebrated local ensembles, and got to hang out with our community. If you’re as sad as we are about waiting a year for the next party, you can relive this one [VIDEO] or join us mid-year for a Calendar Squad shindig.

We’re looking for JavaScript and Python volunteers!
Are you well-versed in JavaScript and Python? We’re looking for volunteers to work with our Web Development team as we prepare to serve other cities in the Fall. Join us this summer as we rebuild our site to make event data easier to discover and explore! If this sounds like fun to you, learn more here or contact us at dev@livemusicproject.org.

We’re growing our board
We’re welcoming two new members to our board and saying farewell to another. Our treasurer, Nadine Stock, has moved on to pursue her growing business. Nadine brought a unique combination of energy, calm wisdom, direct communication, and open-mindedness to our team. We’ll miss you, Nadine!

Meanwhile, Maggie Stapleton joins us as our new treasurer. For several years, Maggie helped launch and cultivate Second Inversion, a 24/7 streaming project from KING FM dedicated to contemporary classical music. She maintains an active role in the orchestral community as a flutist with Puget Sound Symphony Orchestra and Seattle Rock Orchestra. Outside of music, Maggie enjoys middle distance cycling, hiking, rock climbing, cooking, and traveling.

Also joining us is Tim Schmuckal. A teacher, attorney, and strategist, Tim is focusing the second half of his life on helping people and organizations thrive. Currently, this includes his kids, a few non-profits, and a couple friends launching new businesses.

We’re thrilled to be working with Maggie and Tim! (You can also read about our entire team here.)

We felt supported! 
A huge thank you to our donors this month: Heather Bentley, Galen Broderick, Karin Brookes, Christina DePaolo, Jessica Fredican, Ossa Haddas, James Holt, Brendan Howe, Mike Holzinger, Jon Icasas, Nyaradzo Kundidzora, Bryan Lineberry, Jonathan Lyon, Jane Turbiner, and Hannah Turbiner Lyon, Bill Manos, Carol Martin, Sheila Oh, John Reale, Tim Schmuckal, Heather Smith, Jen Steshenko, Daniel Stiner, Paul Taub, Donna Thomas, and an anonymous friend. And to our volunteers and interns: Andrea, Dan, Emily, Hailey, Jeff, Jennifer, Jon, Kent, Lily, Maddie, Marjorie, Nick, Phil, and Veronica. You rock!

(Hey, do you love getting our classical listings? Consider supporting our work with a $10 monthly donation.)

Community announcements

  • Ladies Musical Club of Seattle is conducting new member auditions (May 20)
  • The Seattle Symphonic Band is looking for additional musicians to join the group.
  • Sammamish Symphony Orchestra is auditioning for trumpet and section players in all string sections.
  • KING FM is hiring a program director, webmaster, and more
  • Velocity Dance Center is hiring a technical director
  • KEXP is hiring a traffic assistant
  • On the Boards is hiring a bookkeeper
  • The Seattle Symphony announces its Celebrate Asia Composition Competition seeking to recognize emerging composers interested in Asian culture, music, and traditions; the winning composition will be premiered by the Seattle Symphony at Benaroya Hall.
  • As Town Hall prepares for the upcoming renovation of its historic space, they invite you to a behind-the-scenes tour of the building as it stands today, and how it has been envisioned for the future (May 11 & 24).

Notable deadlines

Media calendar deadlines

  • Seattle Magazine – submit events 3 months ahead for the print calendar
  • City Arts – submit 6 weeks ahead for the online/print calendar (and/or send releases to editorial@cityartsmagazine.com)
  • Seattle Times – submit 14 days ahead for consideration in the curated classical listings (online & print)
  • The Stranger submit any time to the online “Things to Do” calendar; for the quarterly Seattle Art & Performance, submit at least 5 weeks before the start of the quarter in which the event will take place
  • Seattle Met – submit 2-4 weeks ahead of event for the online calendar
  • Live Music Project – submit 1 week prior to performance date (online); deadline for weekend email listings is Wednesdays @ 5pm

To receive this LMP monthly community update by email, subscribe to our newsletter.

We invite you to submit announcements/deadlines for inclusion in this newsletter by the 25th of each month. You can do that here.

~ Newsletter archive ~

Set Free: Compositions for Guitar

The Guitar In My Life
Friday, April 21, 2017 @ 8:00 pm
The Chapel at the Good Shepherd Center, Seattle

In recent months, I’ve been consciously interested in finding the opposite of what I’m currently listening to – adamant to reach out, find something new. New-to-me. As I settle in to write this piece, I’m randomly listening to an album of Jack Kerouac reading his poems, with Steve Allen playing piano accompaniment.

It’s not about music; it’s about the jazzy aura of the Beat Generation: energy, sorrow, exuberance. Wonderment! It’s lyrical. Air and wind.

Kerouac becomes the perfect backdrop as I think about meeting guitarist, composer, and educator Tom Baker to chat about his upcoming show with the Wayward Music Series. “The Guitar In My Life” will feature highlights of Tom’s 25-year career playing guitar and composing new music. The show will include solo classical guitar, electric guitar, and works for guitar and soprano. I asked him what he thought the show was about.

“It’s a celebration of the guitar as an instrument,” he says, without hesitation.

There are certain expectations – rules and norms – that composers may feel compelled to follow when writing for a more traditional ensemble; for example, a string quartet. The guitar? There is no tradition to follow; there are no rules to follow or rules to break.

Tom muses, “It’s only been a concert instrument for about 100 years.” Without a legacy to draw from, a composer is free to innovate, experiment, find the new sound. What can a composer do with that space? “I think of non-traditional sounds and find a way to create those sounds with a guitar.”

Tom Baker with his fretless guitar. (Photo by Tim Summers)
Tom Baker with his fretless guitar. (Photo by Tim Summers)

I frequently wonder if instrumental music is meant to have themes. Would a person image spring or autumn whilst listening to Vivaldi, if they’d not been told, beforehand, the name of the concerti was The Four Seasons? Should the audience think of stories that a piece is about, or is a piece about sounds?

Tom is quick to tell me that for his music, “it’s about sounds.” He uses stories, poems, pieces of literature as motivation; he strives to create sounds that work with the imagery in his head, but the final piece has to stand alone.

Green Guitar, for example, is about a dream he had after buying a new guitar. In the dream, his favorite old guitar, and this new guitar, have a battle for supremacy. Great story! Close your eyes and imagine two guitars duking it out, showing off, playing secret chords and magic riffs; now imagine a composer writing that down. Very cool! However, “I always tell my students that it’s risky to expect an audience to have a certain reaction,” Tom instructs.

Here’s my recommendation: Just listen and enjoy. If the listener has guitar compositions in their repertory already, this should be a great show; Tom has been doing this for a long time, and has a well-respected catalogue, and a catalogue that he is notably excited about. And for the listener without guitar composition as part of their normal? It’s time to come out and give it a try; let it be your opposite experience.

Tom Baker & friends will perform on Friday, April 21, 2017 @ 8:00 pm at The Chapel at the Good Shepherd Center in Seattle. Full details are here.

GreatWall_GreatKent_BWxKent Karnofski has been a Seattleite most of his adult life. By day he is a research engineer at a local manufacturing firm, by night he is an extraordinary audiophile. In addition to his work with the Live Music Project, he is the curator and primary contributor at CommunityNoise.blog.

The Astronaut, the Electric Theorbo, and the Plan that Wasn’t

When I arrived in Seattle in 2013, the Live Music Project was just a little nugget of an idea. On March 31, the LMP turned 3! I want to pinch it on the cheeks and say annoyingly, “I knew you when you were this big!”

On Tuesday, April 11, we’re throwing a party for the LMP so we can all pinch its cheeks. There will be cupcakes, door prizes, musician/composer Aaron Grad, his electric theorbo (it’s like a large lute mixed with an electric guitar)… and an ASTRONAUT named Heide.

Heide will tell stories about mishaps in space.

Aaron will improvise based on a flight of beer.

The program begins at 6:30pm at Naked City Brewery in Greenwood. Tickets are $15 online and $20 at the door (very limited availability).

Can’t make it but would still love to support us? DONATE HERE and watch the livestream!

Happy birthday, little LMP!

~ Shaya

Community update: April 2017

LMP software engineering interns Jeff, Maddie, and Hailey.

In this edition: Lost in space, artist interviews, software engineering, local media & grant deadlines, and more!

LMP news

We’re hosting an astronaut! And an electric theorbist! (And you’re invited!)
April 11 is your chance to meet an astronaut and find out what happened when she lost an important item during a spacewalk. Also, if you’ve never heard an electric theorbo, well… NOW YOU CAN! Join us at Naked City Brewery as we raise our cupcakes in a toast to improvisation. Tickets are $15 online, or $20 at the door. Seating is limited. Get tickets here.

We launched a tech internship
March showers bring April interns! (Or so it seems…) We’ve launched a software engineering internship and are excited to welcome SU students Madeline Wong, Hailey Nam, and Jeff Atwood to our team. In their own words:

» A technology enthusiast, gamer, exercise lover, and HUGE foodie, Maddie is a first-year MSCS student at Seattle University. She is fairly adventurous and always on the lookout for new and interesting discoveries (especially when they are related to food).

» A hard worker and a self-motivated learner, Hailey is a master’s student studying computer science at Seattle University. She believes one of the best ways to relax is by listening to any type of music, including classical music, movie soundtracks, and K-pop!

» Passionate about exploring, cooking, gaming, and helping others, Jeff is always up for a challenge! Currently a sophomore at Seattle University, he aspires to help those around him with his work and make an impact in his community. Although he enjoys genres of music from classical to rap, odds are that he is listening to techno/electronic while working on this project!

We welcomed a volunteer coordinator!
The LMP is a small organization that relies on volunteers and interns to have a BIG impact. As we grow, we are thrilled and inspired by the dozens of volunteers who have given their time and skills to help us provide free services to our community. Enter Jon Icasas, LMP’s new volunteer coordinator and a long-time volunteer and supporter. Among other things, Jon is an engineer and a hobbyist musician who plays viola with the Seattle Philharmonic Orchestra. If you’ve signed up to volunteer, you’ll be hearing from him very soon. Welcome, Jon!

We shared stories from Jennifer Ellis and Stuart Dempster Endlessly fascinated with how artists do their craft, we love getting their stories out. This month, guest writer Kent Karnofski talked to harpist Jennifer Ellis about the impetus to take things apart and put them back together, and we also interviewed composer/trombonist Stuart Dempster about smores, ticking timers, and the art of listening.

We felt your love!
A big squishy bear hug to our donors this month: Heather Bentley, Jessica Fredican, James Holt, Mike Holzinger, Jon Icasas, Jonathan Lyon, Jane Turbiner, and Hannah Turbiner Lyon, Bill Manos, Carol Martin, Sheila Oh, Jamee Pineda, and John Reale. And to our volunteers and interns: Hailey, Jeff, Jon, Kent, Lily, Maddie, and Nick. You make this all possible!

(Hey, do you love the LMP? Join us as a volunteer or consider supporting our work with a $5 monthly donation!)

Community announcements

  • Tacoma Opera is holding auditions for principal roles (April 28-30).
  • Sammamish Symphony Orchestra, under the musical direction of Adam Stern, announces auditions for all strings.
  • KING FM is hiring an administrative assistant.
  • Town Hall is hiring a marketing manager.
  • KEXP is hiring a digital director and digital content manager.
  • As Town Hall prepares for the upcoming renovation of its historic space, they invite you to a behind-the-scenes tour of the building as it stands today, and how it has been envisioned for the future (April 12 & 26).

Notable deadlines

  • April 24 – ArtsWA Project Support application deadline (level B – $200K to $1M annual budget)
  • April 30 – 2017 Pacific Northwest Conducting Institute application deadline; PNCI provides a unique opportunity to study with the internationally-acclaimed conductor and educator, Diane Wittry, author of Beyond the Baton and recent workshop leader at the New York Conducting Institute (Whidbey Island, July 31-August 5)
  • May 22 – ArtsWA Project Support application deadline (level C – over $1M annual budget)
  • Rolling – 4Culture Open Arts Grant; apply at least 6 weeks prior to event date
  • Rolling – Seattle Office of Arts & Culture smART ventures grant application deadline
  • Rolling – Langston Hughes Performing Arts Institute facility grant; apply at least two months prior to event date
  • Rolling – Spontaneous Free Tickets; contribute tickets up to 1 week prior to performance date

Media calendar deadlines

  • Seattle Magazine – submit events 3 months ahead for the print calendar
  • City Arts – submit 6 weeks ahead for the online/print calendar (and/or send releases to editorial@cityartsmagazine.com)
  • Seattle Times – submit 14 days ahead for consideration in the curated classical listings (online & print)
  • The Stranger submit any time to the online “Things to Do” calendar; for the quarterly Seattle Art & Performance, submit at least 5 weeks before the start of the quarter in which the event will take place
  • Seattle Met – submit 2-4 weeks ahead of event for the online calendar
  • Live Music Project – submit 1 week prior to performance date (online); deadline for weekend email listings is Wednesdays @ 5pm

To receive this LMP monthly community update by email, subscribe to our newsletter.

Submit announcements for inclusion in this newsletter by the 25th of each month.

Community update: March 2017

Late-night design sessions bring out the best in us! (Photo: LMP)

In this edition: An astronaut, a new website, local media & grant deadlines, and more!

LMP news

We’re turning 3 (and an astronaut is coming to the party)
In a truly spectacular display of inter-disciplinary thematic linking, we invite you to our 3rd birthday party: “The Astronaut, the Electric Theorbo, and the Plan that Wasn’t.” What happens when things don’t go according to plan in space? We’ll find out from former NASA astronaut Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper! What happens when you decide to merge an oversized lute with an electric guitar… and beer? That, too, will become clear (we think) when Aaron Grad hits the stage. Join us on April 11 at Naked City Brewery as we raise our cupcakes in a toast to improvisation! Tickets are $15 online, or $20 at the door. Get your ticket here.

We’re building a new website!
Speaking of turning 3… in our wise old age, we’ve learned a few things about maintaining concert listings. We’ve also invited concertgoers into our (makeshift) studio to observe them accomplishing tasks on the LMP. (One example: “Friends are coming to town next weekend. Find a concert to take them to. They’re flexible, but prefer Saturday if possible.” Or, “As you’re looking at this event, you realize the date is incorrect. What do you do?“)

Working with programming lead Nick Pozoulakis and designer Veronica De La Peña, we’re building on the best of the LMP and incorporating our learnings into a new website that will launch in the coming year. We’ll be focusing on comprehensiveness and accuracy; the event submission process; search; site speed; and more. We’ll keep you posted along the way!

We welcomed a volunteer coordinator!
The LMP is a small organization that relies on volunteers and interns to have a BIG impact. As we grow, we are thrilled and inspired by the dozens of volunteers who have given their time and skills to help us provide free services to our community. Enter Jon Icasas, LMP’s new volunteer coordinator and a long-time volunteer and supporter. Among other things, Jon is an engineer and a hobbyist musician who plays viola with the Seattle Philharmonic Orchestra. If you’ve signed up to volunteer, you’ll be hearing from him very soon. Welcome, Jon!

We felt your love!  
A big squishy bear hug to our donors this month: Heather Bentley, Jessica Fredican, Andrew Goldstein, James Holt, Mike Holzinger, Jonathan Lyon, Jane Turbiner, and Hannah Turbiner Lyon, Bill Manos, Sheila Oh, Jamee Pineda, and John Reale. And to our volunteers and interns: Andrea, Emily, Jon, Kent, Lily, and Nick. You make this all possible! (Hey, do you love the LMP? Join us as a volunteer or consider supporting our work with a $5 monthly donation!)

Community announcements

  • Tacoma Opera is holding auditions for principal roles (April 28-30).
  • Seattle Chamber Music Society is hiring a Director of Development with a focus on Individual Giving – a one-person department responsible for designing strategic fundraising initiatives and plans as well as for implementing donation processes and maintaining donor records.
  • Cornish College of the Arts seeks a director of marketing and and administrative assistant for the dance department.
  • KING FM is hiring a part-time music assistant.
  • Town Hall is hiring a full-time social media coordinator.
  • KEXP is hiring a lead audio engineer and donor services manager.
  • Resonance at SOMA Towers, an Eastside venue perfect for intimate music performance paired with wine and beer, is seeking nonprofit performing arts organizations and/or independent unincorporated musicians and ensembles interested in partnering during our 2017-18 season.
  • As Town Hall prepares for the upcoming renovation of its historic space, they invite you to a behind-the-scenes tour of the building as it stands today, and how it has been envisioned for the future (March 14 & 22).

Notable deadlines

  • March 6 – Seattle Office of Arts & Culture Youth Arts grant application deadline
  • March 27 – ArtsWA Project Support application deadline (level A – under $200K annual budget)
  • April 24 – ArtsWA Project Support application deadline (level B – $200K to $1M annual budget)
  • May 22 – ArtsWA Project Support application deadline (level C – over $1M annual budget)
  • Rolling – 4Culture Open Arts Grant; apply at least 6 weeks prior to event date
  • Rolling – Seattle Office of Arts & Culture smART ventures grant application deadline
  • Rolling – Langston Hughes Performing Arts Institute facility grant; apply at least two months prior to event date
  • Rolling – Spontaneous Free Tickets; contribute tickets up to 1 week prior to performance date

Media calendar deadlines

  • Seattle Magazine – submit events 3 months ahead for the print calendar
  • City Arts – submit 6 weeks ahead for the online/print calendar (and/or send releases to editorial@cityartsmagazine.com)
  • Seattle Times – submit 14 days ahead for consideration in the curated classical listings (online & print)
  • The Stranger submit any time to the online “Things to Do” calendar; for the quarterly Seattle Art & Performance, submit at least 5 weeks before the start of the quarter in which the event will take place
  • Seattle Met – submit 2-4 weeks ahead of event for the online calendar
  • Live Music Project – submit 1 week prior to performance date (online); deadline for weekend email listings is Wednesdays @ 5pm

To receive this LMP monthly community update by email, subscribe to our newsletter.

Submit announcements for inclusion in this newsletter by the 25th of each month.